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 the stuff that binds

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soothsayer
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PostSubject: the stuff that binds   Sat Aug 06, 2011 6:10 pm

I like models; the gentle curves, the shades and tones, the soft recesses of... *ahem* I also enjoy model kits. Whether it is a military scale model, or a tabletop miniature, or even a popsicle stick construction, I enjoy assembling things. Over the years, I have primarily stuck with one or two particular brands when it comes to making sure my models stick together; this was done mainly out of habit, but also out of financial situations. However, I have recently gone against my instincts and have tried something new, and I don't think I'll go back.

Anyway, here are the things I recommend when it comes to building model kits.

1. Epoxy Adhesive - I love this stuff. It comes in a two tube / plunger system; one tube holds the resin, the other the catalyst... push plunger, mix, and wah-lah, and epoxy that will support up to two tons, is waterproof, sandable, paintable, and best of all, can be moved and adjusted for a couple minutes before it sets... in 15 minutes! I use this primarily for pewter / soft lead figures, put have also found it useful for gluing pebbles onto scenery (I'll have to post a pic of my bridge one of these days). This stuff is relatively cheap, anywhere between $3 to $5, but seriously, you don't need the higher priced stuff; 1500 pound adhesion is just as good as two ton, especially when you are just gluing a couple ounce figure.

The epoxy, in my opinion, beats out JB Weld and Superglue. Why? Although the JB worked well on pewter, it eventually lost its bonding; my youngest dropped a figure and it fell apart. I believe it may have had something to do with the fact that I never scored the pieces to allow for greater bonding. Irregardless, the epoxy has held up to a few other droppings. And with the superglue, sheesh, where to even begin! It either doesn't set, or once you tire of holding a piece together and it slips a little bit, that's when it sets. Oh, I should also mention that with some models, especially Warmachine products, pinning is recommended... but let it be known I have never pinned, and could never even begin to tell you how; the epoxy is that good.

2. Testor Plastic Cement. This used to be my pick over everything else, but has fallen to the side for most plastic projects. However, I will still use it when the need arises: after dry fitting some parts, if there are any gaps, I will use this product. Being a gel, it will nicely fill in most gaps... just be careful not to over use it, as some pieces will melt, which then smears and looks downright awful. Also leaves thin spider webbing. NOT recommended for clear parts!

3. My current love... "Plastruct Plastic Weld". Picked it up at a local hobby store, it is a 2 ounce bottle of clear liquid glue that you apply with a small brush. Oh my god, do I love this stuff! It is a little pricier than Testor's stuff, but it was worth it (also note that the store I bought it from tends to have prices about 25% higher than the manufacturer's recommended price). The reason I bought it was because I recently purchased a high end military model... the M1128 MGS Stryker, in 1/35 scale, from AFV Club. Very detailed, lots of very tiny pieces, my most complicated kit yet. Anyway, I wanted this to look good, so out when the plastic cement. I cannot say how other liquid glues are, as this is my first experience, and I bought the cheapest one I could; all I can say is it is worth it. Just keep in mind to dry fit before you apply the glue, and know exactly how and where the piece goes, because the set time for this is quick. Damned quick. Luckily, if you need to reapply a coat of glue, it isn't a problem.

4. Elmer's Wood Glue. Seriously. I've worked with a variety of wood glues, and I gotta tell ya, they all work the same. Why pay more when the cheapest does the trick? Helpful hint: when filling in knots or gaps, mix some saw dust with the glue... this'll make a paste which fills any unsightly areas without a problem.

Remember, these are just my opinions... you may have a better choice, or may think differently, and that's fine. Let me know. Let us know. When it comes to modeling, the most important thing is the glue... it doesn't hurt to offer suggestions, especially if it makes for a better finished product. Hell, toss out some tips while you're at it!
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PostSubject: Re: the stuff that binds   Sun Aug 07, 2011 3:29 pm

Helpful popsicle gluing technique #1... binder clips.

http://www.bing.com/images/search?q=binder+clips&view=detail&id=98ACB563ED822F7863065FAC50F8C34D67D99FD4&first=0&FORM=IDFRIR

What can I say? These are great little clamps that come in a variety of sizes for a variety of applications!
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PostSubject: Re: the stuff that binds   Wed Dec 25, 2013 12:28 pm

Yay, I just discovered a neat little trick, all by myself!

When gluing two particularly large pieces, whether they be resin or pewter or what-have-you, if these pieces are too big for clamping with clips, try electric tape!

The tape easily conforms around the piece's detailing and structure, so you don't have to worry about damaging anything; it stretches, ensuring a tight fit while the glue dries; if any of the tape's residue remains on the piece, it's easily removed with warm water and soap; lastly, it's cheap. Most of us probably have rolls of it lying around. If not, a trip to the local discount store can remedy that.

Right now, I'm using electric tape to hold some resin pieces together while the generic super glue gel dries. Don't know if the glue's going to work or not, but the tape is working like a charm!
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PostSubject: Re: the stuff that binds   Thu Dec 26, 2013 8:08 pm

Making a separate entry instead of an edit...

The electric tape is excellent! Not only does it stretch / conform / hold pieces together tightly, but it also doesn't leave any residue. Any glue that seeped through and came into contact with the tape easily scratched off with a gentle rubbing of a toothpick; granted, this was on resin, so there may be issues on injection plastic kits...

Electric tape, I highly recommend it for your modeling needs!
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PostSubject: Re: the stuff that binds   Mon Nov 23, 2015 8:11 am

Been assembling a lot of Skorne figures lately (won a couple lots on eBay), and while there are some plastic models, a vast majority of them are the white metal.  For gluing white metal, I've always (at least, for the majority of the time) used a super glue gel, one with a five or ten second bond.  I've tried super glue liquid, but it's too runny, especially when trying to piece two small pieces together... but it is good when assembling larger pieces, where an even flow / application would be best.

However, I have run into a couple snags, with which someone here can help.

I know a lot of the professional or above average modelers say that for the best hold, you need to pin the pieces together and then glue.  That may be all fine and dandy when you are working on a piece big enough to drill with a pin vise, but what if it isn't?  For instance, on the Skorne Beast Handlers, the point of bonding is the model's right elbow... the surface area is the same diameter of a standard paperclip.  I eventually got the piece to stay on, but now I fear it'll fall of as I try to shave / file the excess glue from around that joint.

My next question is in regards to the type of glue that you've found to work best.  While I don't really prep my models (none of them, neither metal or plastic or resin), I do file the contact points on the white metal.  I do that mostly to get the milky residue off of them... but right now I'm thinking perhaps I'm filing them too smoothly?  Anyway, most of the time, the pieces will join together no problem.  Hold them together for a few seconds, peel off my finger, and it's good to go.  Other pieces I have to hold for a minute or so, and bonding area is a tad wiggly, so I have to quickly set up a stand to add support while it cures.  And then, there are the pieces that, no matter what the hell I do, they just won't hold.

Anyone else experience that?  Any suggestions or tips you've come across or have done to alleviate that situation?

{EDIT}

I just remembered, I have one of those rigs with the magnifying glass and the two alligator clips... I should be using that to hold the pieces together!
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